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Dry Mouth - Drugs - Dental Health Articles

People who take multiple drugs for health conditions may be more likely to notice effects on saliva or taste, a study concludes.

The study involved 531 people who visited a cardiology clinic in Saudi Arabia. About 14% of them had at least one oral symptom, including:

  • Dry mouth (8%)
  • White or grey patches in the mouth (4%)
  • Problems involving the sense of taste (2%)

For most people, these conditions were not bothersome.

Dry mouth was more common in women, and in people with diabetes.

No specific heart drug was linked with any of the three conditions in this study. But the researchers did find that people who took multiple drugs — including drugs for non-heart-related conditions — were more likely to have mouth-related symptoms.

Many drugs for heart conditions can have effects in the mouth. For example, some drugs for high blood pressure or congestive heart failure can cause dry mouth. Dentists call this condition xerostomia. Dry mouth can increase the risk of tooth decay. Experts recommend that people give their dentist a list of the drugs they are taking, and their doses.

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Dental Insurance - Dental Coverage - Health Insurance

About three out of four persons under age 65 years with private health insurance had some type of dental coverage. Among persons with dental insurance, more than one-half had a single-service dental plan only, or in addition to dental coverage through their comprehensive health insurance plan.

Non-Hispanic white persons were more likely to have dental insurance through a single- service dental plan only than non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic Asian, or Hispanic persons. Poor persons (less than 100% of poverty level) were more likely than higher income persons (400% or more of poverty level) to have dental coverage through a comprehensive plan only.

Approximately 45 million persons under age 65 years with private health insurance did not have dental coverage in 2008. About 7 out of 10 persons who directly purchased their own private health insurance plan had no dental coverage compared with about 2 out of 10 persons with employment-based insurance. About 40% of persons with less than a high school education had no dental insurance of any kind.

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National Dental Hygiene Month - Dental Hygiene - NDHM

With the theme "Healthy Habits are Easier than You Think" for its National Dental Hygiene Month (NDHM) celebration this October, the American Dental Hygienists' Association (ADHA), in collaboration with Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company, manufacturer of Orbit® sugarfree gum, promotes the idea that good oral hygiene habits are simple to establish and maintain, even for the person living an active lifestyle.

"It is imperative to our overall health to have a healthy mouth," ADHA President Caryn Solie, RDH, said. "Brushing, flossing, rinsing with an anti-microbial mouth rinse and chewing sugarfree gum are easy ways to help avoid issues that could affect the status of your oral health."

"Brush, Floss, Rinse, Chew" is a reminder that maintaining good oral hygiene habits can have lasting effects. Keeping a healthy mouth can help prevent oral disease.

Brushing your teeth for two minutes at least twice daily can reduce plaque build-up and the risk of diseases like cavities and gingivitis; flossing removes plaque and food particles under the gumline and between your teeth; rinsing your mouth each day with an anti-microbial mouth rinse is another important step in preventing gum disease; and chewing sugar-free gum like Orbit® after eating stimulates saliva production, which helps fight cavities, neutralizes plaque acids, remineralizes enamel to strengthen teeth and washes away food particles.

In tandem with this initiative, the Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company Foundation has established a Community Service Grant Award program with the ADHA Institute for Oral Health to fund initiatives providing oral health services and education in all 12 of the ADHA's districts across the country.

"Wrigley is committed to improving the general understanding of the role of sugarfree gum as part of a healthy oral care routine," says Pat Alexander, Sr. Marketing Manager, U.S. Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program. "We are committed to providing services that help improve oral health and lives; this extends to our support of the American Dental Hygienists' Association National Dental Hygiene Month."

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Dental Implants - Dental Technology - Implant Information

Dental implants have offered a successful way to restore teeth for more than 20 years. New challenges for improving the process include shortening the time to restore functionality and meeting aesthetic demands. Altering implant surfaces to help promote bone integration is one solution. SLActive, a new chemically-modified surface for titanium, the standard material of which implants are constructed, has shown positive results in this area.

An article in the August issue of the Journal of Oral Implantology reports a 98.2% success rate for SLActive at dental patients' one-year follow-up. A noninterventional study was conducted to compare these results with previous findings of high survival and success rates among the same type of implants in a controlled clinical trial.

In this noninterventional study, results were obtained under common dental practice conditions where patient selection was not restrictive and technique was not controlled. Thirty dental clinics in Italy participated, and 226 patients were treated. Patients presented with a variety of risk factors, and both early (48 hours to 3 months) and traditional (3 to 6 months) loading of the implant was performed.

Osseointegration-the connection between living bone and artificial implant-can determine stability of the implant over time. Surface properties of the titanium implant, such as topography and roughness, can assist the chemical and biological interface that occurs in the early stages of healing and thus influence the long-term outcome.

The 98.2% success rate of this study was similar to that reported in formal clinical trials. The high success rate in both studies shows that the SLActive implant surface can be safely used with consistent, predictable results. Patients can expect integration of their implants that restores functionality for chewing and speech as well as aesthetics.

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Periodontal Therapy - Preterm Birth - Dental Health Articles

US scientists have found a strong link between the success of gum disease treatment and the likelihood of giving birth prematurely, according to new research published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

There are a number of factors such as low body mass index, alcohol consumption and smoking which are associated with an increased rate of preterm birth. More recently researchers have reported that oral infection may also be associated with such an increase.

This study looked at 322 pregnant women who all had gum disease. The group was split into two groups; one group received scaling and root planning - cleaning above and below the gum-line - and oral hygiene instruction while the other group only received oral hygiene instruction.

The incidence of preterm birth was high in both the treatment group and the untreated group; 52.4% of the women in the untreated control group had a preterm baby compared with 45.6% in the treatment group. These differences were not statistically significant.

However, the researchers then looked at whether the success of treatment was associated with the rate of preterm birth. The women were examined 20 weeks after the initial treatment and success was characterized by reduced inflammation and no increase in loosening of the teeth.

Within the treatment group of 160 women, 49 women were classed as having successful gum treatment and only four had a preterm baby (8%). In comparison, 111 women had unsuccessful treatment and 69 of these (62%) had preterm babies. These differences are highly statistically significant.

The results show that pregnant women who were resistant to scaling and root planning were significantly more likely to deliver preterm babies than those where it was successful.

The mean age of the women in the study was 23.7 years, 87.5% were African-American and 90% had not seen a dentist for tooth cleaning.

Marjorie Jeffcoat , Professor of Periodontology at the University of Pennsylvania and lead author of the paper, explained: "Our research group is very excited about these results. First these data show that pregnant women can receive periodontal treatment safely in order to improve their oral health. Second in a high risk group of pregnant women, such as those patients who participated in this study, successful periodontal treatment, when rendered as an adjunct to conventional obstetric care, may reduce the incidence of preterm birth. Future papers will address the role of antimicrobial mouth rinses in reducing the incidence of preterm birth."

Professor Philip Steer, BJOG editor-in-chief, said: "Researchers have previously suggested that severe gum infections cause an increase in the production of prostaglandin and tumour necrosis factor, chemicals which are associated with preterm labour. This new study shows a strong link between unsuccessful gum disease treatment and preterm birth.

"However, we need to bear in mind that 69% of women failed to respond to the dental treatment given. Therefore more effective treatment will need to be devised before we can be sure that successful treatment improves outcome, rather than simply being a marker of pregnancies with a lower background level of inflammation that will go to term anyway.

"It is important that pregnant women are given advice on dental treatment, however it is also important to note that there are many other causes of preterm birth that should also be tackled, such as smoking, excess alcohol consumption and obesity."

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Cavities - Stress - Children Dental Hygiene

In young children, certain social and psychological factors seem to increase the risk of tooth decay, a new study finds.

Researchers from the University of British Columbia in Canada did the study. They kept track of 132 kindergarten children for 2 years. Nearly half of the children had tooth decay.

Decay was linked with three factors:

  • High levels of decay-causing bacteria
  • High levels of a hormone called cortisol
  • A family income below poverty level

Children with the most decay had high levels of decay-causing bacteria in their mouths. They also had high levels of cortisol in their saliva. Cortisol is released in response to stress. It aids in the body's digesting of sugars.

The researchers also examined any baby teeth that were normally lost during the study. Children with more cortisol in their saliva had baby teeth with thinner, softer enamel.

The authors suggest that the process of producing a cavity in a tooth is influenced by factors such as poverty level and stress.

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2508 Hits
Dawn C.
Jodi has worked with me to get the right date for payment and made something usually very tedious into a 1, 2, 3 and done! She is great!!!

 

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