Dental Articles for Individuals

Dental Articles for Individuals

Breastfeeding and Dental Health | The Connection

breast feeding

One of the most important decisions that you will make for your newborn is whether or not you will breastfeed. And you might already know about some of the many benefits that your milk could provide to your baby, such as a boost to his or her immune system. But what about your baby’s dental health? And what about your dental health? Is there a connection between oral health and breastfeeding, for both mom and baby?

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Infants Thumb Sucking | The Dental Effects

thumb sucking

It’s totally natural for your infant to suck on his or her thumb or cry for a pacifier, but this is a habit that could adversely affect the health and appearance of your child’s teeth. Check out the information below to learn about when thumb sucking stops being soothing and starts being a problem.

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10 Facts About Baby Teeth

10 Facts About Baby Teeth

Baby teeth: they serve a much more important role than you think. Sure, they’ll all fall out or have to be pulled out at one point, but there is a need. Baby teeth start growing before birth and serve a huge role in our lives as we get older. Regardless of age, baby or adult, teeth help us chew and talk. Those little chompers can have quite an impact, so we’ve provided you with a list of ten facts, stats, and tips that might even amaze mothers with grown children!  

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Taking care of baby teeth

 A child's primary teeth, sometimes called "baby teeth," typically begin to appear when a baby is between six months and one year of age, are as important as the permanent adult teeth. Primary, or "baby," teeth are important for many reasons. Not only do they help children speak clearly and chew naturally, they also aid in forming a path that permanent teeth can follow when they are ready to erupt.

The ADA recommends that a dentist examine a child within six months of the eruption of the first tooth and no later than the child's first birthday. Consider a dental visit at an early age is a "well baby checkup" for the teeth. Besides checking for tooth decay and other potential problems such as thumb-sucking.

 Parents should take their children to the dentist regularly, beginning with the eruption of the first tooth. Then, the dentist can recommend a specific program of brushing, flossing, and other treatments for parents to supervise and teach to their children. These home treatments, when added to regular dental visits and a balanced diet, will help give your child a lifetime of healthy habits.

 

 

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